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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 102 (some duplicates have been removed)
golden age this span of the 17th century where trade, industry and science were among the world. the one small port of amsterdam were one of the commercial centers in the entire world. this concentration of capital enriched bankers and merchants but also created the society in europe. the arch of the dutch golden age. 17th century travelers visiting holland remarked on the number of artist. typically western european artist on the monarch and the nobility as well as the very wealthie catholic church. an open market to a wide clientele that arranged from variety of merchants. it displays a modern domestic rather than extravagant or royal setting which it was carried. emily who is the director of the morris house. the expansion which i will talk about in an a little bit will give it more space. for the collection there is a limited pictures they can acquire but too large for the building. so where do the paintings come from? how can they be there. this is an exceptional and remarkable museum. this splendid 17th century city palace was constructed between 1633-1634 next to the dutch gove
incubator, and make room for the next big idea-- like enbio, a materials science company, also launched from university college dublin. the startup is pioneering new treatments for metals that won a contract for the heatshields on the european space agency's orbiter heading to the sun in the coming years. karl flannery, who started his own tech services company storm technologies during the boom years, is worried about a talent shortage in ireland. he wants more emphasis on science and mathematics education for irish kids, and an open door to bright young people like chugh from everywhere. >> we're looking at short-term, medium-term, long-term. we're going to change how we change work permits for non- irish national, so that will help bring in a lot more skilled computer science people into the irish economy. that will help bring in a lot more qualified, skilled computer science into the irish economy. >> suarez: but to have a healthy domestic economy, ireland can't just create great jobs for manipulating data on microchips. there's a role for potato chips too. this family has been growing p
be contributing this as well. >> so far he has already come out on education, immigration and on science. >> and it's really smart. >> one of the reports had a long time gop guy getting involved. >> watch out for the google glasses. the legislator says it's like wearing a computer. it's dangerous and similar to texting and driving chblt. >> i haven't signed up. you remember that science project thing? get away from him to do this. you know, the geeks are very excited. i'm hesitant about people driving with anything on their face that doesn't have to be there. i can understand it. maybe it will make people better drivers. >> maybe this would help for gps. i have a gps that is on the dash. it could be easier. at the end of the day, people are so distracted. you don't need another distraction. >> i agree. the less that is distracting you the better. >> amazon studios adding zom beeland to prime instant video. >> what amazon is doing is interesting. they will put them on. anyone can watch them and give comments and vote on which of these pilots you want to see developed into full series. and
, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, t
that i only heard in eighth grade science class, the last science class i had, the chart has gone parabolic. did i ever claim to work at the jet propulsion lab? what it meant was that stocks had started to go up in pretty much a very steep slope. this is a parabola. so steep that the angle is getting a little dangerous if you're all the way up here, right? here it's still pretty good and you get there and it's a nice place to plunge, right? and you got to wait so that time would pass and it wouldn't be such a steep parabola. she wasn't saying that we were going to crash at all. she wasn't saying the companies weren't any good. she was simply stating that it leaves little room for error particularly when you're in the straight-up portion of the parabola. it's plenty of them as this list of parabolic stocks that i wrote down shows. this is incredible. i know. i hadn't really had this many stocks in parabola motion and they've risen the highest and the hardest and the ones taking the cake are the insurers and the banks, some of the transports. those insurers and bank stocks were stro
things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. lookake's >>> take's look at the crowd surrounding post 9 this morning and it is rare to see all of these people and there is one reason you're seeing all of these people and it is because of model. one of the most anticipated ipos of the week. the week being the busiest week for ipos so far this year. we're a quarter in and also this huge bull run and a lot of people and companies want to get out of the gate and raise their money. we'll talk to the ceo of model n right after the bell is rung and after the first trade is exec e executed and we have about a minute to go before the opening bell on wall street. we watch a lot of things and not just stocks and we're seeing in wti and brent. copper also joining us. the buyer bounces and anything can bounce. ipo week is good. brunswick study of m & a, highest activity in a long time. m & a ipo may be a commodity lift and bad day to be sure. >> even though with the caterpillar news and even with the fedex news. >> you have to pick your spots. deere
pores for visibly clearer skin in as little as 12 hours. yeah, it's fast. clearasil, the science of clear skin. (vo) current tv gets the converstion started next. >> i'm a slutty bob hope. >> you are. >> the troops love me. the sweatshirt is nice and all but i could use a golden lasso. ♪ >> announcer: this is the "bill press show," live on your radio, and current tv. >> bill: here we go 12 minutes before the top of the hour. the "full court press" on abmonday morning, march 18th. well, three months now since the december 14th massacre at sandy hook elementary school but for hedge funds and financial firms on wall street it has been business as usual. bill has made this a key issue of his. he joins us again on our news line this morning. bill also a candidate for mayor of new york city. good morning. >> hey bill it is a good to be back. >> bill: thanks for joining us again. i know you put out the word for investors to drop these gun manufacturers, and they are doing just the opposite right? >> most of them are. but we have seen a couple of companies go the other w
kids' education, science and research. they also cut medicaid which affects a lot of those seniors on medicare, about 20% of those seniors are also on medicaid. but it's at the end of that 10-year window that our republican colleagues then move to their voucher plan, premium support, i don't care what you call it. the only way you're going to achieve any savings compared to the baseline numbers, c.b.o. baseline that the chairman showed you, the only way you're going to do it is if you're capping the amount you're going to get so that seniors have to eat the costs and take the risks of rising health care. now, there's a better way to address that issue and that is the way we approach it in our budget and that is to build on the kind of reforms that we made in the affordable care act, in obamacare, which have helped and contributed to reducing the rapid rise in per capita health care costs and which as i pointed out earlier our republican colleagues included in their own budget. so, yes, we have to deal with these drivers of costs, including health care. but the way we propose to do
that this guy is not, a, qualified to do it. and there's nothing really there, it's junk science. so the judge will hear from both sides in the next 15 minutes and expected to rule from the defense, so the direct testimony can resume whether or not the judge will allow this part of it in we'll find out very soon. >> ted, before we get any kind of rulings at all, there is buzz now, not surprising, of a tv movie that is actually in the works. what do we know about that? >> yes, well, what we don't know is what it would be rated given all the graphic testimony in this case. >> no kidding. >> we know lifetime -- yeah, lifetime is making a movie about this. a made for tv movie, the jodi arias trial. they're in works on that. they've done this before. they did it with the drew peterson case, rob lowe was in that and they have one coming out in a couple weeks on the casey anthony case. rob lowe ironically is also in that one. we'll have to see what role he'd play in this one if he is, but bottom line getting terrific ratings on television and makes perfect sense to exploit that and make a tv movie ou
it's not rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> well the dow is on track to end the week in the red overall, but still we have some winners this week. in fact the second best performer is coca-cola as a matter of fact. up by about 3% for the entire week. it did say that it is cutting 750 jobs in the united states. it is streamlining its business as they always put it. and the biggest winner on the dow for this week is hewlett-packard. hp up more than 3 1/2% for the week. the board over there approved a 10% dividend increase and did that yesterday. so that gives you an idea of some of the individual stocks that are doing well in the dow. we'll close in the green today. as i said for the week looks like we're still down as we wrap things up on the "countdown to the closing bell". the combination of david asman and shibani joshi. david: we like this combination you've been asleep past hour because it is 2:00 a.m. your time. >> viewers noticed i did sleep. david: good to have you here, shibani. sandra smith as we close out the day. apple for a second. slow com
-ingrants. anti-women. anti-science, anti-gay, anti-worker and the list goes on and on and on. >> for the last three weeks, conservatives have been winning. >> the gop of old has grown stale and moss-covered. i don't think we need to name many names. >> i want to bring in washington bureau chief of the chicago sun-times, lynn sweet, as well as as politics reporter jackie kucinich. we'll start with you, one of the first recommendations in this report, almost 100 pages, it says, quote, the perception that the gop does not care about people is doing great harm to the party and its candidates on the federal level, especially in presidential years. it is a major deficiency that must be addressed. end quote. so, lynn, after reading this and hearing this do you think this new rnc plan is going to help? >> well, some of the structural changes that the chairman is proposing may help, especially having a shorter primarien is and cutting almost some 20 debates you in the 1220 psych until half. to 10, maybe 12. that will help structurally. they want to put a lot of money in digital technology going into i
. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and na
on the fourth amendment and drones surveillance. received her j.d. from new york law school, bachelor of science degree from florida state university. please go ahead. >> thank you, chairman leahy, ranking member grassley, and members of the committee for your leadership on this area. in our statement today, epic recognizes that drones have tremendous positive uses in the united states. however, when drones are used or gather idence personal information about identifiable individuals, rules are necessary to ensure that fundamental standards for fairness, privacy and accountability are preserved. recent records received by epic under the freedom of information act demonstrate that the bureau of customs and border protection has outfitted drones with technology for electronic signals and interception and human identification. law enforcement offices across the country have expressed interest in the purchase and use of drone technology. records released shows that law enforcement in texas, kansas, washington are using drones. the florida police chief's association has expressed interest in using d
number of students who are in graduate degrees from american colleges in science, tech, and math would be granted permanent legal status. that's great news. tech lobbyists had to pull a full-court press on d.c. arguing google and microsoft having a hard time finding qualified workers because of visa restrictions. >>> the "los angeles times," jeff basa has recovered some of the f-1 engines to bring "apollo" to the moon. he recovered them after three weeks at sea working miles below the atlantic ocean. >> obviously, that is great news. >> yeah. >> like an explorer. >> the baton rouge advocate has nothing about chasing down rocket engines from 1969. the library of congress sound of satellite news center by simon and garfunkel and the twist by chubby checker. you are my sunshine by jimmy davis. it was chosen on local and artistic importance. >> workers must report their weight and body fat or face 600 dollars in terms of health insurance premiums. >> let's go to happier news. did you see this, mike? >> i'm not sure that's fair. >> how about that? so "the tonight show" is coming to new york
degrees in critical science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields. in the u.s., 76% of all registered -- from the top, from the top 10% producing. they come from foreign students. foreign students here in the u.s. who then become inventors. these foreign-born inventors are driving economic prosperity with the consequences of their background in these hard sciences. in our current system, we welcome foreign students to the united states. we provide them the world's best education, and then we send them home so that they can compete against us. and, frankly, this makes no sense. america's current involvement in asia must not be confined by the same old approaches that may have once served a purpose, but for now woefully outdated. indeed, we must harness the full potential of american ingenuity to address the spectrum of challenges we have before us. and this is out build samsung in the aftermath of the korean war. and much like the mythical phoenix rising from the ashes, south korea and samsung are today truly world class. together, we can ensure that the future legacy of ame
editor dr. richard besser is here to tell us more. i know there's a lot of complicated science but can you break it down and explain how it works. >> this is pretty incredible. using a patient's own immune system to fight cancer. take a look at this animation. they had five patients with untreatable cancer. they used a virus to inject genetic material into a patient's own white cells to turn them into cancer fighters. those then went out in the body and destroyed all the cancer cells. these patients, they all went into remission. three of them had bone marrow transplants and are doing great. >> we didn't realize one of the patients, our own david aponte, our sound man, we spent time with him and it's incredible. >> yeah, i spoke with david the other day, and, you know, he credits this with saving his life. last summer he had had lots of chemotherapy. he thought he was in remission and his cancer bounced back. there was nothing left for him to do. he had this treatment. they injected the cells. overwhelming reaction in his body, eight days later not one cancer cell could be found. he ha
a conference, the annual conference of the american political science association, which even now -- certainly then is very austere and trickish and boring event, and we try to. it up a little bit. we had a lot of good ideas. none of which i will mention until the cameras are shut off. [laughter] and i want to say, it was adjust lot of fun to work with ben. when i told them when the ideas were it, it will improve your -- [inaudible] [laughter] so ben has a point of view about how to save the world because the world is in a kind of planet, as we know it, and our country as we know it, is in big trouble. and those troubles include the ecological crisis that we hear about all the time and go about our daily life just as we did before, as if there will be a tomorrow and a tomorrow and tomorrow but there might not be. those troubles include widening spiraling inequality. they include the erosion of the infrastructure of democratic governance but the structure of living together that means the infrastructure of transportation and utilities, the networks that we depend upon as well as the governing s
, and he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> i am lauren simonetti with your fox business brief. an $8 billion stock repurchase for ppe. it closed on the sale of its 50% investment. it received $12.5 billion in cash along with an 18.5% stake. analyst site that retailers see a strong program of buyback as well as dividend increases. the cash register maybe on its final sale. stores nationwide opting to ring up sales on smart phones. walmart already testing a scan and go app. that is the latest from the fox business network. giving you the power to prosper. ♪ matters in just minutes. protect youramily... and launch your dreams. at legalzoom.com we put the law on your side. and launch your dreams. today is gonnae an important day for us. you ready? we wanna be our brotr's keeper. what's numberwo we wanna do? bring it up to 90 decatherms. how bout ya, joe? let's go ahead and bring it online. attention on site, attention on site. now starting unit nine. some of the world's cleanest gas turbines
things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. dennis: winter refusing to die. look at cleveland, ohio right now, just one of several cities getting hit by the latest snowstorm. we'll have more on the cost of this storm coming up. sandra: it's spring already, dennis. stocks now every 15 minutes. we have team coverage. dennis: the c.m.e., charles payne will show us how to make money on cyprus and nicole over at the indices. >> looking at the major market averages at the market. we see the dow, nasdaq and s&p 500 all lower. s&p 500 is down about a quarter of 1%, nasdaq down one third of 1%. dow jones the worst, down about half of 1%. we should note we've had a swing here today on wall street. about 136 points from top to bottom. we actually set a new intra day all-time record high this morning but then sold off on concerns of other european stories such as italy and we're seeing some of those spanish banks selling off so here you go. first you had a little optimism on the hopes of the cyprus bailout and then you started to learn here that
to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td amitrade. ...amelia... neil and buzz: for teaching us that you can't create t future... by clinging to the past. and with that: you're history. instead of looking behind... delta is looking beyond. 80 thousand of us investing billions... in everything from the best experiences below... to the finest comforts above. we're not simply saluting history... we're making it. >> hi, everyone, i'm diane macedo with your fox business brief. stocks are modestly lower despite better than expected reports on the u.s. economy. concern about the european debt crisis and slumming tech stocks are weighing on the markets and right now the dow is down about 29 points. >>> lufthansa is grounding nearly 40% of the its flights after the union representing the airline's employees authorized a strike. the walkout started 4:00 a.m. local time. this comes as the next round of wage talks are scheduled for tomorrow. >>> mcdonald's is making the chicken mcwrap a permanent part of its menu. the wrap will come in t
education, job training, health care and advanced science and research. even with these investments, our budget is projected to reduce the deficit by approximately $2.8 trillion over the decade compared to the c.b.o.'s baseline which incidentally does not include the savings that we will achieve through the winding down of the wars in iraq and afghanistan. that will put us on a sustainable goal and more than meets the the goal. so we feel that is a responsible goal. now this number is pessimistic, because with the jobs bill, we think we are going to do a lot better because of the similar effect it has on the economy. this is in stark contrast to the committee report, which has vague numbers, numbers that don't add up or don't give you a clue as to where they're going to get the money. the budget has a reduction in tax rates. does not say how you are going to make that revenue neutral, where you are going to assign the $5 trillion in taxes to make it revenue neutral. they block grant medicaid. by the time the end of 10 years, it's one-third of where it needs to be to maintain benefits. 2/
all these. >> caller: i'm arnold in troy, michigan. want to ask about a company called orbital science corporation. i bought some shares a few years ago. >> i recommend it from time to time. we need a little more stable market for that one. let's hold off on that one. tom in new jersey. tom. >> caller: jimmy! >> yo, yo. >> caller: tommy from lafayette, new jersey. does cisco deserve the hit it got today? >> stephanie link, co-director of action alerts with me, we were in a tizzy this morning. we believe the long-term picture for cisco is so good. we know it caught a downgrade today, but the long term is so good, own for the charitable trust. i like that ratio. cisco is terrific. and that, ladies and gentlemen, is the conclusion of the lightning round. >> the lightning round sponsored by td ameritrade. >>> what are you supposed to make of the markets ups and downs? what's going to happen tomorrow, next week or next month? this market is full of pitfalls. you've got to try to avoid them. the key to surviving an unpredictable market, don't have all your eggs in one basket. that's why i pl
're hopeful for edwards life science. it's been a little more controversial. that's the catheter delivered heart valve. there's been debate about the pace of the launch of that. it's at a lower point now. we think expectations are probably more appropriate. and the stock is attractive. that one is also that we have good expectations for. additionally, in the technology space we have pretty good sized positions in google which is perked up on a year to date basis but we think is getting back on track. 12 months ago that was fairly controversial. it's not nearly so controversial now. >> all right. greg, you don't know offhand whether any of those companies are -- have open board seats, do you? >> no, i don't. i'm not aware of that. >> okay. just wondering. >> you have the science background. >> just let me know. see you later. >> nice to talk to you. >> we're on break. altman. did you do that just for me? >> i was hoping he would. >> talking about all the boards. you're just throwing it in my face. >> you were talking about corporate boards. there are probably many noncorporate boards that w
's not rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. ♪ it was the best day ♪ ♪ it was the best day yeah! ♪ it was the best day ♪ because of you [sigh] [echoing] we make a great pair. huh? progressive and the great outdoors -- we make a great pair. right, totally, uh... that's what i was thinking. covering the things that make the outdoors great. now, that's progressive. call or click today. >>> infrastructure is one of the best things we can do to boost the economy. it creates short-term jobs. over the long-term, better roads, railways, ports, electrical grids, broadband. they invite businesses to operate more efficiently. they save them money, they create jobs. if you're a regular viewer of this show, you probably saw me go underground in new york city last summer to get a closeup look at one of the biggest public works projects in american history. i'm talking about manhattan's second avenue subway line. completing it will cost around $22 billion. what's behind the mammoth tab? here's what i found out when i traveled underground. >> reporter: backhoe exka varieties, man lift
: susan estridge is a professor of law and political science at the university of southern california. i hate to laugh at the minority leader's comments, but one of the finest days for the senate in recent -- for those of us who don't speak washingtonian what, is voterama? what is that? >> you know, it's a washington phrase for how you take votes without running into a filibuster possibility. so everybody can vote, but the republicans in this case don't have to decide when we fill buster and when we don't. so you play this game. it's a nonbinding resolution, as you know. so it's not even like this is the real budget. this is the senate's toss over the wall. you know, i can only say, if student government at usc worked like this, we would all be up in arms and say, can't these kids figure out how to make a decision? i think that both sides of the aisle just look a little bit silly. >> rick: i think you're absolutely right. in the end, the thing gets passed, but at the same time, nobody thinks for a minute that it's going to become law. the whole thing is a charade. >> right. so they all g
science and engineering. they saw the fruit of that exercise. it was large in everyday papers. you can take that talent and apply it to something worthy. >> do you think it's fair to say that the push to the moon, the interest in nasa all in some way led to the computer and information revolution? >> there are people who say that would have happened anyway, but certain facts undeniable. the urge to miniaturize electronics did not exist before the space programs. our grandparents had furniture that were radios. nobody said i want to carry that in my pocket. when you launch something into space, electronics of any kind, weight matters because it's very expensive to put every incremental ounce if you don't have to put it there to launch into orbit. the miniaturization of electronics got a jolt of interest by the early space age. and then once you see that it's miniaturized, all of a sudden a whole new world of consumer electronics opens up that was unimagined and undreamt of before. by the way, the urge to find an economic justification, i think, is laudable, but that's not the biggest re
to beat people back from the door that wanted to take science and engineering. you can take that talent and apply it to something worthy of your investment in time and energy. >> you think it is fair to say the push to the moon, interest in nasa all in some way led to the computer and information revolution. >> there are people that say that would have happened any way. there are certain facts that are undeniable. the search to minimize electronics. no one was saying, i want to carry a tv in my hip pocket. it is a nonthought. when you launch something this to space, electronics of any matter, weight matters. it is costly to put it in to orbit. the minturization of electronics got a jolt of interest by the early space age. then once you see it is miniaturized, all of a sudden a new world of consumer electro c electronics opens up that was unimagined and dreamt of bmplt so, yes. in the urge to find an economic justification is honorable but not the biggest reason to do this. the reason is the culture it innovates foosters an invasion nation. everyone is thinking about it. innovation beco
a coupon and kids got to attend the science enrichment program. >> it's really about selling anything, it's about allowing companies to come in and partner for a good cause and public education in responsible ways. >> there are aggressive campaigns out there buses and playing fields becoming common. for some districts it's what keep the doors open. critics argue it comes at a high price. >> kids deserve a commercial-free education and that the messages in schools have been selected because they're good for them, good for their education and not because it's the highest bidder paid for them. >> one more point here, harris. a national education policy stresses that the harm comes with a campaign contradicts what a child learning in class or a paid-for program places something educational. back to you. >> harris: dom, thank you very much. i'm going to live tweet during fox weekend, as i do each weekend. who is atop your bracket. and peter schrager getting pretty and the blue angels. they've dazzled people for decades. and that's about to change. how budget cuts are grounding the highfliers.
. medical science is leading the way with breakthrough technology. tonight, cramer's kicking off a week-long series highlighting some of the most revolutionary companies that maybe heading higher. be heading higher. >>> when the market was really getting hammered earlier today, and of course last week courtesy of the european woes, i came back to the question i always ask whenever the averages get whacked by some supposedly terrifying exogenous event. nobody likes the way the europeans are dealing with cyprus ordeal with anything for that matter, but what the heck does that have to do with the price to earnings multiple of bristol-meyers? nothing. that's what. yet this has been my mantra every time something bad happens in the world. as bristol-meyers is your classic defensive big pharma stock, company is going to keep growing no madder how badly the europeans screw up things because people always need their medicine. frankly, i think it's accelerating its growth. it's time to update this dictum to keep up with the times, old dog, new tricks. the big pharma stocks have been on a real ro
things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> is social >>> is social media working for companies? coke has something to say about it and julia boorstin has more. >> that's right. online buzz or social chatter has no impact on short-term sales and it is the most popular brand on facebook with 62 million likes and 700,000 twitter followers. facebook actually agrees, saying quantity of chatter doesn't matter and citing a study of more than 600 campaigns that focused on getting the message in front of more people rather than generating more buzz had 70% more return on investment. coke has no plans on changing strategy saying that the display ads on facebook are 90% as effective as tv media. >> let's continue this conversation as we jump off it. i want to give you the results of our yahoo! finance poll. does facebook and social media influence what you buy? 3% said yes and 11% said from time to time and 86% said it never does. gm basically said they were not going to spend any money or time on social media because it was not wor
-fly zone. we need to arm the rebels about. this is not exact science what to do there. we need to take sides. the darwin one evolution what is happening in syria, hundreds of thousands of dead. a central country with a diversity of population could have ben one of the shining lights now because of the evil nature of the assad regime being destroyed before our eyes. melissa: doctor, thank you for coming on, thank you. >> anytime, melissa. melissa: coming up on "money", soaring health care costs slamming businesses and workers across the country but a radical new approach could put workers control of what is spent. we'll explain that. because at the end of the dayou know it, it is all about money. ♪ . melissa: a new push for private health care options could leave you with more money in your pocket only if you put in the work. in an effort to take money they would spend on health care for employees, giving it directly to them, letting them pick their own plans based on what they need the results are surprising. most employees are choosing different plans than when the company was payi.
recipients. that is because a bachelor degree ranges from everything from nursing, science, engineering, mathematics, very lucrative fields to humanities like history and sociology which don't earn as much money. tracy: so that being said, especially based on unemployment these days, and we have heard from some many businesses that we have so many spots and not the skilled workers to fill them . should reveal to get financial aid regardless of where you do as long as you're educating yourself to another job? >> i think that your total student loans a graduation should be less than your annual starting salary because then your ability to repay the debt is dependent on their income. so i think the limits should be based on predict -- predictability repay debt. tracy: the none of us would go the four year colleges because there are very few of us that there -- that will come out -- i could easily, with $250,000 in loans, and i'm not making that first year of college. >> the average death for a master's degree last year was 27,000. the average starting salary for a master's degree was almos
and netanyahu make peace. and from "the christian science monitor," a show of warmth. joining me is p.j. crowley. good to see you. >> hello, chris. good morning. >> evidence of this warming relationship came from the prime minister himself. let me play for you what he said. >> i think that people should get to know president obama the way i've gotten to know him. >> do you sense just from what you've seen over the last 24 hours or so, p.j., that this relationship is warming? if that's true, how important is it? >> well, it is important. you know, there are major strategic issues that -- and a really shared vision between the united states and israel on the big things. iran, the middle east peace process, and i'm sure the president and prime minister talked about syria as well. clearly, they've had strains in their relationship, but these are both skilled politicians. yesterday was about, you know, putting a floor on their relationship because they're going to be governing together, you know, for a number of years. you know, the pictures were reassuring, the words were reassuring, and yesterday w
a colleague here in congress brush off the warnings of science about climate change, saying, "god's still up there," implying that there's no need to worry about climate change. well, if god is still up there, what better use of the gifts of moral reasoning that we have been given as his people than to protect his creation and one another from harm? madam president, as we sing in the old hymn, "field and forest, veil and mountain, flowering meadow, flashing sea, chanting bird and flowing fountain call us to rejoice in thee." we are each called in our own way to wake up and to do the right thing. i yield the floor. mr. nelson: madam president? the presiding officer: the senator from florida. mr. nelson: madam president, i just want to comment on the senator from rhode island's comments. first of all, i know it's so heartfelt and so genuine, and i want to thank him for that. and i want to thank him from approaching it from a faith-based standpoint about this fragile ecosystem that we live on called planet earth. and he's brought a perspective with that chart that he had of the earth that it is
a new science-based economy like in europe. they very well cannot stand by --n -- stand by it cannot stand by when a massacre as called out by the syrian president against his own people, his own children. an arsenal of chemical warheads. wasnuclear installation destroyed. arsenal remains in his hands to this very day. danger for thee syrian people, for the entire region. we have to prevent the chemical weapons from falling into their own hands. the best option to put an end it to the syrian tragedy might be achieved by empowering the arab league of which syria is a member, to intervene. and an intervention of the would succeed as a foreign intervention. should form a provisional government in syria to stop the massacre, to prevent syria from falling to pieces. the united nations should support the arab league to build an arab force in blue helmets. friends, 18 years ago i came to sign the association of agreement between the european union and israel. reality hashat surpassed expectations. partnership, and before long, the partnership became a french ship. it is on this day that i p
him, and he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. . >>> 40 seconds left. downow is . >>> 40 seconds left. the dow is down 66 points heading lower. ben willis, are you troubled by devevelopments in cyprus or are you reassured that we're only down 66 points today? >> i think we go further. i think the whole world should be very concerned that somebody believes in a one off in cyprus. con c confisca confisca confiscateion of private property. >> thank you very much. see you later. dow down about 60 points on the close. stand by. meredith whitney and john thain coming up on the second hour of "the closing bell." i'll see you tomorrow. >>> and it is 4:00 on wall street. do you know where your money is? hi, everybody. welcome back to "the closing bell." i'm maria bartiromo on the floor of new york stock exchange. stocks closed lower after a flare up in the eurozone debt crisis. take a look at how we're settling today on this monday afternoon on wall street. dow jones industrial average down 60 point
. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: today's supreme court arguments pitted a national law against a 2004 arizona voter registration bill. the case explores the extent of state powers against the controversial backdrop of voting restrictions. arizona's proposition 200 requires state residents to provide either a driver's license, passport, birth certificate or physical proof of citizenship before they can vote. but an existing federal law requires only a sworn statement of citizenship on a voter registration form. supporters say the arizona measure cuts down on voter fraud by keeping noncitizens from voting. but opponents argue the law unfairly tarring hes minorities, immigrants, and the elderly. the case is only the most recent dispute betw
in terms of the science behind basically the premonition that jodi arias did forget because she was under so much stress, which will is documented in cases like this, but it is taken with a grain of salt in this one because they are remember nothing conveniently about the sactual stabbing. >> intriguing. >>> the fbi now says it know who was behind one of the largest art thefts in the country. [ chainsaw buzzing ] humans. sometimes, life trips us up. sometimes, we trip ourselves up. and although the mistakes may seem to just keep coming at you, so do the solutions. like multi-policy discounts from liberty mutual insurance. save up to 10% just for combining your auto and home insurance. call liberty mutual insurance at... to speak with an insurance expert and ask about all the personalized savings available for when you get married, move into a new house, or add a car to your policy. personalized coverage and savings -- all the things humans need to make our world a little less imperfect. call... and ask about all the ways you could save. liberty mutual insurance -- responsibility. what's y
't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> crazy >>> crazy day. crazy day. volatility is back. >> but this market will not quit. that's the bottom line. >> and i'll tell you what, as much as we downplay the size of cyprus and its impact economically on the eu, it has had an impact on our markets. this is when we thought we'd heard that the finance minister in cyprus had offered his resignation and it wasn't accepted. now he's denying that he's offered his resignation. whatever that means. and then we get this move here in the last hour on talk that maybe the ecb was going to offer more liquidity, which they've confirmed, but what does that mean? are they going to bail them out or not? we'll see. we're moving higher here.
first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> >>> four-minute mark right now. let's show you a few things. if you're just joining us, give you a quick recap. a down day for wall street today and a lot of the eyes were on cyprus, where at the low point, the dow was down 128 points, then it came roaring back all of a sudden. still trying to work things out sp . so the volatility you see there sort of reflects the scrambling that's going on right now as they try to resolve their banking crisis. the best performers in the dow today, there were some stocks that were higher. coca-cola and verizon, the two leaders. coke, there, up half a percent and verizon up a like amount, i am told. there it is, also up half a percent. the big loser was cisco. and as you pointed out, maria, probably a reflection of what happened with oracle last night in those earnings. that's down 3.7%. oracle, itself, has been the worst performer among the s&p 500 stocks today, down about 10% today. >> we're keeping one eye on cyprus, but also keeping one eye
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